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The love affair between VCs and the media is unraveling

By NexChange
Venture Capital

It's tough going from hero to zero. But as the startup craze ages and cracks in the facade of many startups (or at least their valuations) are beginning to appear. Most recently, The Wall Street Journal published a searing story on startup sweetheart Theranos, the lab that takes "nanotainers" of blood from the phlebotimically-challenged.

Venture capitalists didn't take too well to the challenge to the private company, valued at $9 billion. Business Insider says this is becoming a bit of a pattern these days: The fawning is mostly over.
Nobody likes to be questioned.

But lately, some of Silicon Valley's big tech investors seem to be particularly upset that journalists are questioning some of the valley's hottest startups.

There's a fundamental difference in point of view here. The funders see first-hand how hard it is to build something and sympathize with the struggle. The journalists are supposed to be as objective and careful as possible and report what they find — even if some people don't like it.
That's an incredibly nice way of saying that some journalists aren't swallowing startup news releases without questions. Seems like a backhand compliment: The press corps that largely missed both the financial crisis and Bernie Madoff can hardly be called fierce or clairvoyant.

And BI also notes that for every upset VC there are also some pretty experienced investors who are also ringing the alarm -- including Marc Andreessen and Mike Mortiz of Sequoia. Not bad company to be in.
Photo: Owlana

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